Museum will refer to Cosby issues


Associated Press

WASHINGTON

The Smithsonian now plans to acknowledge the sexual-assault allegations against Bill Cosby at its new African-American history museum on the National Mall, which will display two items related to Cosby’s career in television and standup comedy.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opens Sept. 24, will include the cover of a Cosby comedy album and a comic book from his pioneering TV drama “I Spy” as part of its exhibit on black entertainers and artists. Initially, the museum planned to include historical facts about the items without mentioning the allegations, drawing criticism from some Cosby accusers.

The museum’s founding director, Lonnie Bunch, said in a statement Thursday that the display would address Cosby’s alleged behavior, although he did not specify exactly how.

“Like all of history, our interpretation of Bill Cosby is a work in progress, something that will continue to evolve as new evidence and insights come to the fore,” Bunch said. “Visitors will leave the exhibition knowing more about Mr. Cosby’s impact on American entertainment, while recognizing that his legacy has been severely damaged by the recent accusations.”

Through a spokeswoman, Bunch declined to comment further.

Dozens of women have accused Cosby, 78, of sexual abuse. Cosby was charged last year with drugging and sexually assaulting a former Temple University worker at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004, a case that is on hold amid an appeal. He also faces several civil lawsuits.

The Smithsonian Institution also has been criticized for its recent exhibit of Cosby’s personal art collection at a different museum. The exhibit was funded almost exclusively by Cosby and his wife, Camille, in the form of a $716,000 gift, which Smithsonian officials did not disclose until they were asked about it by The Associated Press.